• This Discussion Thread has 19 replies, 13 voices, and was last updated 2 days, 9 hours ago by Mykyta.
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    • #2656
      Sharon
      Member

      Reflection question: Effective cleaning and disinfection practices reduce the risk of transmission of infections to health care workers and patients. What can you do at your workplace to support effective cleaning and disinfection?

    • #6944
      Debra
      Member

      In order to have effective cleaning and disinfection we will approach supervisors and approach health and safety committee in regards to issues if cleaning isn’t being done or done properly. In long term care is always fight to have extra staff when outbreak happens and remind staff of hand hygiene. In isolation rooms always auditing that staff wear proper PPE.

      • #7095
        Erin
        Member

        You make a good point about staff capacity to complete routine cleaning and disinfecting. Patient care always comes first.

    • #7014
      Dianah
      Member

      what I can do support effective cleaning is ensuring proper disposal of waste products,ensuring that waste products are effectively sorted out.Ensuring proper hand hygiene and disinfecting and touch surfaces in the common areas.

      • #7017
        Debra
        Member

        Yes nursing staff has the biggest issues with effective cleaning and disinfection. As a nurse on the floor and health and safety rep, garbage and recycling , sharps and filled sanitizers on the wall are always being checked. As well as resident rooms for staff to work in a clean environment and not a room that has alot of personal things in the way where staff can’t clean properly.

    • #7034
      Darlene
      Member

      Ensure staff have a proper understanding of the different cleaning solutions. Reinforcing the cleaning of high touch areas. We have students at my home who do our high touch cleaning so ensuring they understand what that means and where to focus. Also making sure I am up to date on the cleaning routine and procedures.

      • #7097
        Erin
        Member

        That’s a great idea, train volunteers to assist with the some of the cleaning.

    • #7049
      James
      Member

      As a nurse, cleaning/disinfection isn’t one of our top proirities in the hospital setting, however, one of the things I do most is to occasionally wipe down any high-touch areas that the nursing staff use most. For example, medication machines, computer keyboards, work surfaces, as well as appliances in the break room. It helps prevent transmission most amongst our colleagues. I try to do this every shift change at a minimum. Our housekeeping staff are also invaluable to not only cleaning these areas but other high-touch areas around the units where patients and visitors frequent.

      • #7079
        Jessica
        Member

        Hi James,
        Cleaning may not be a top priority in hospital because there is a lot more support than most settings, but that being said, I think you are cleaning/disinfecting probably more than you realize 🙂 For example, I never use a vitals sign machine without disinfecting in between patients.

    • #7078
      Jessica
      Member

      To support effective cleaning and disinfection all staff at our location have completed the practice health check training. This training both online and in person gives us basic tools for being aware of IPAC measures in place every day we may not notice. I find that educating colleagues on WHY we are doing what we are doing, not focusing only on the HOW, gives a broader understanding and appreciation for the work being done. We have signage posted in high touch areas for gentle reminding, and work collaboratively with our cleaning staff. There are cleaning supplies available in every office and communal area for easy access as well as PPE if needed.
      I’ve mentioned in a previous post that team work makes all the difference in healthcare settings. Cleaning may not be on a nurses radar amongst many other pressing tasks but it certainly should be incorporated into our daily practice.

      • #7098
        Erin
        Member

        Would you have the website for the practice health check training? I would like to check it out as a potential resource to use with my PSWs.

    • #7096
      Erin
      Member

      As the supervisor of agency staff in a facility setting, I could liase with the facility management to better understand their current cleaning and sanitizing practices and make suggestions on how we can support initiatives as a team. I could perform regular audits by observing current practices and provide feedback to the facility as well as my own stafff. It is tricky as our current contract with the LHIN does not allow for environmental cleaning in facility, so we could not bill for the extra time. However, perhaps the organization would allow for IPAC measures to be paid at an added hourly rate.

    • #7101
      Simone Martha
      Member

      At my LTCH we have an environmental department who is responsible for daily cleaning and disinfecting of each unit. One environmental staff is assigned per unit, however it has to be a team effort approached. As a unit Supervisor, myself, PSW and other Unit Supervisors will clean and disinfect commonly used areas and equipment, e.g nursing station, telephones, medcarts, BP machines and thermometers at the beginning of each shift. In combination there are also set weekly schedules for cleaning and disinfecting medical equipment including medication fridge, clients beds and bedside tables. I also think it is important to maintain good communication with the assigned environmental staff so that any lapses on both sides can be communicated, this process requires a team effort.

      • #7111
        Taylor
        Member

        I think that is a very good routine with having a set schedule of what is to be cleaned weekly and when! When I worked nights at a RH I would take initiative and give the medication fridge a deep clean once a week as it seemed to often get overlooked.

    • #7112
      Taylor
      Member

      At the clinic I work at I know the importance of cleaning down anything that has been touched after finishing with one client before having the next one come into the room. Enforcing hand hygiene with the other nurses and clients is also important when it comes to reducing the risk of transmission.

      • #7237
        James
        Member

        Totally agree.. everyone needs to be on board and have education on cleaning practices. The more people that are involved in the setting that have this awareness, this lessens the chances for spread of infection to other people and settings.

    • #7125
      Bart
      Member

      It takes the collective effort of whole health care team maintain effective cleaning and disinfection.
      Some issues that we encounter in the unit is shortage of staff, both housekeeping a nursing staff.
      If housekeeping is short, we help out by disinfecting high touch areas.
      We also sanitize washroom after client use it.
      We clean tables as well after meals ad after shifts.
      If we are short of cleaning and disinfecting supplies, we quickly communicate this to our lead and housekeeping as well. We do weekly audit just to make sure we have enough supplies for the weekend.

    • #7133
      Diana Marie
      Member

      Personally, I make sure that all the machines I use gets cleaned and disinfected after every use most especially in between patient use. I make sure my work area is clean before and after my shift. Practice of good hand hygiene I think is also very important in maintaining cleanliness of the environment in the workplace.

    • #7135
      Sharon
      Member

      I recently started at a retirement home. I find there is many cleaning and the disinfecting tasks. Thermometers in between patients, blood pressure monitors and O2 sat monitors, we try to use equipment dedicated to our isolation rooms but we still disinfectant after every use. We are cleaning surfaces like door handles and call bell pendants constantly as they are high touch. Keyboards and computer equipment – on med carts and at desks in nursing station are another area we attend to regularly. I feel like it has become so routine we may not realize how much we do in a shift.

    • #7331
      Mykyta
      Member

      One of the most recent issues I had on the unit was a lack of knowledge about different types of disinfectants in the workplace.
      We had a suspected C-diff outbreak. One of the cleaning staff recommended wipes specifically designed for the job, but they were highly corrosive compared to the wipes we are used to. Of course, nobody read the labels, and everyone was using those as regular wipes. I had to intervene and put those back into the stockroom frequently.
      I think there should be more education on different types of cleaning supplied, especially when nursing staff are expected to clean up bodily fluids before cleaning staff arrives.

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