• This Discussion Thread has 16 replies, 12 voices, and was last updated 2 weeks, 3 days ago by Allison.
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    • #2980
      Sharon
      Member

      Do you believe there is a difference between managers and leaders? Explain your position and provide examples.

    • #12706
      Janet
      Member

      “In my experience, there’s a definite difference between managers and leaders. Managers often adopt a ‘do as I say’ approach, reluctant to questions or feedback that could challenge their decisions—even if those decisions prove unsuccessful. Feedback from them tends to feel more like personal criticism rather than constructive input on performance. They rarely admit mistakes and often shift blame onto the team when things go wrong.
      On the other hand, leaders are adaptable and value the opinions of their team members. They make decisions that benefit both the team and the company, listening attentively and seeking areas for personal and team improvement. Throughout my career, I’ve worked under various supervisors and managers, and I’ve found that I perform best under leaders who appreciate my efforts, respect my opinions, and consider my suggestions.
      I’ve encountered situations where managers push for changes without considering how they impact the team or individuals involved, leading to dissatisfaction and reduced effectiveness. I’ve learned to appreciate leaders who are approachable and calm rather than authoritative, as they create environments with fewer mistakes and better overall work experiences.”

      • #12715
        Carmen
        Member

        I agree that there is a difference between managers and leaders. Leaders create a supportive environment while managers often focus on directives. I’ve also found working under leaders who value and respect the team input to have better effectiveness.

    • #12714
      Carmen
      Member

      Yes, I think there’s a difference between managers and leaders. For me, a manager is someone who focuses more on structure and the tasks that lead to a certain goal, whereas a leader is someone who has the ability to influence and motivate others to work towards a certain goal by creating a vision and prioritizing the people. I’ve had instances where a manager has been a leader by demonstrating empathy, fostering collaboration, and inspiring the team to exceed goals. So it is possible to be both a manager and a leader.

      • #12756
        Alhasan
        Member

        Completely agree! When you have the good fortune to encounter someone who embodies both roles, demonstrating empathy, fostering collaboration, and inspiring the team to exceed goals, that is indeed someone you want in your workplace. Those individuals not only ensure that operations run smoothly but also inspire their team to achieve excellence and drive positive change. This combination of skills is invaluable and greatly enhances the overall work environment.

    • #12744
      Melissa
      Member

      Yes, I believe there is a difference between leaders and management. From my experience working as a manger in the food industry and now as an RPN in a leadership role I believe leader’s are adaptable to their environment and are very team orientated. Leaders tend to value their team’s input and opinions. Which in turn builds a trusting relationship amongst the team. They tend to make their decisions based on what’s best for their team and company as a whole. Managers often make decisions that may only benefit their company. From experience they don’t really care for their team’s input and opinions and rarely listen to them causing lack of trust and dissatisfaction from their employees. Managers also take on a more of a “do what I say” role and often disagree or don’t listen to the Teams input as they don’t want to be wrong. Leaders tend to provide coaching in the moment to their team members and don’t put them down for what they have done but rather look at it as a teaching moment. Managers tend to. Provide constructive criticism and put blame on their employees when something has gone wrong leading to lack of trust and employees not wanting to approach management.

      • #12761
        Rebecca
        Member

        Hi Melissa,

        I enjoyed reading your post. I agree with you and can appreciate how you described a manager being a “do what I say” and leaders’ approach in a coaching style, I am witness to this on the daily and see management making decisions based on what will benefit the company as opposed to their team. Again, something I see within my area of work as well.

    • #12755
      Alhasan
      Member

      Yes, I believe there is a distinct difference between managers and leaders. However, when these roles are combined effectively, the result is truly seamless and exemplary.

      Managers in my experience are primarily task-oriented, focusing on duties such as scheduling, budgeting, ensuring compliance with regulations, and managing the day-to-day operations of the unit. Their role is essential for maintaining the smooth and efficient functioning of the workplace, ensuring that everything runs as it should.

      Leaders, on the other hand, take on a more inspirational role. They create a positive work environment by encouraging education, advocating for staff and client needs, and striving for improvements in patient care and staff welfare. Leaders not only ensure compliance with existing regulations but also advocate for policy changes that enhance these regulations, driving the organization towards continual improvement. Leaders are the individuals you want on the floor that will take what you say and take action with it.

      In essence, while managers handle the operational aspects, leaders focus on fostering growth, motivation, and innovation within the team and the workplace. Both roles are crucial, and their integration leads to a well-balanced and thriving healthcare environment.

    • #12759
      Rebecca
      Member

      I believe there is a difference between managers and leaders, although there are many similarities and traits the two roles are indeed different. A manager focuses on planning and organizing to ensure there is efficiency and productivity and a leader focuses on the abilities to motivate and drive the productivity. In my position I seek support from management when needing to confirm policies and procedures and as a supervisor I lead my team and support in all aspects to ensure the day-to-day is achievable.

      • #12768
        Claire
        Member

        Hi Rebecca,

        I love how you describe yourself as a leader on the floor with your staff and connect with your managers in regards to policies and procedures. I have always typically thought of the “leader” is the one at the front of the organization, such as the ED, as those on the floor guiding the day to day as the “managers” who follow the “leader”. But you are absolutely right that those on the floor are leading the team. My team lead is leading me as much as my DOC or ED are. Those working shoulder to shoulder with the front line staff are guiding and encouraging them through the obstacles and struggles of the work day. That I believe is a “leader”.

        Thanks for the post 🙂 Lots to think of!

    • #12764
      Sherri
      Member

      I believe there is a small difference. For example an ambulance has just arrived at the hospital. The ER triage nurse follows the organizations prioritization levels. Seeing that another patient suddenly takes a turn for the worse, the Nurse take matters into her own hands and takes the patient back into a pod, despite any repercussions. Nurse managing, yet is a leader. Please excuse my limited vocabulary as this is all new to me, and its been awhile since my school years. I also believe there is no right or wrong answer.

    • #12765
      Claire
      Member

      Hello Everyone! This is Claire.

      Prior to completing the exercises and required readings in the initial module of this course , I had more of a “black and white” concept of what I felt were the roles and differences of a manager vs. a leader. I realize that this course and its content/discussions are going to broaden my knowledge and understanding profoundly!

      I felt that leaders were those in a position at an organization who developed policy, missions and vision in collaboration with other high level influencers. I saw them as separate and somewhat inaccessible to front line staff, with their decisions and actions “trickling down” to managers and staff. An example of this could be if a decision was made to integrate two elements of an organization to create a new more holistic model of care, a “leader” in collaboration with a board would have come to this decision and its elements/goals/missions, not a “manager”.

      I saw managers as those of “us” elevated to roles who mission was to manage the actions of the workers to achieve expectations/goals of the leaders. The managers were the ones accountable for ensuring the success of the leaders decision. An example of this related to the previous example of model of care redirection could be that managers would be the ones to organize opportunities for collaboration, ensure completion of tasks determined to support the goal and provide evidence based updates to leaders about the success of their new vision..

    • #12770
      Sherri
      Member

      This is true managers handle the actions of others to achieve expectations and success of their leaders. I also believe Rebecca makes a good point.

    • #12774
      Ruth
      Member

      I do believe there is a difference between managers and leaders.  First of all, they do not share the same meaning. As the name suggests, leaders are those who lead team members towards a certain goal. Or success.  While managers manage employees, aim for success. Leadership involves planning, organizing, implementing, and controlling resources to achieve a certain goal, motivating and encouraging new ideas, and working toward long-term strategic objectives.  However, managers are vital in maintaining operational efficiencies, ensuring tasks are completed, resources are optimized, short term objectives are met, and  facilitating day-to-day activities. 

    • #12783
      Logan
      Member

      I think there is a difference between managers and leaders.
      In experience having a good manager often came with them being a good leader. And I know not all managers are leaders but I again from my experience I wanted a manager that is not going to talk at me but leads and motivates me to be better. Managers are mentors for leaders, how does one mentor without being a leader?

      Managers that I have worked for are there to manage/oversee the unit/facility/team etc. from a distance. They are often not part of direct care or frontline in anyway. They are found “behind the scenes”/in their office usually. Managers usually are seen on units in there is a need for them to be involved, debriefing after a code, checking in to see that the unit is managing/functioning enough otherwise they are there to resolve short term goals within a timely manager but have long term outcomes. Managers are designed to give direction, appoint someone as a leader to ensure tasks get done, reward/acknowledge good work ethic and provide active feedback when necessary. Managers usually have their “go to” leadership team such as a Charge Nurse or a few a specific people. These leaders would assist with the moment needs, provide education/demonstrate skills/knowledge/practice, motivation others and offer validation/feedback etc. and in the event there are concerns or changes would be beneficial for the manager to be involved, the leadership team would then communicate that need for them.

      As for leaders: Nurses lead daily or at least we should be. We are providing care and on-going education for those in our care, as well as their families/loved ones. This doesn’t stay within client care though, together we should help other and often comes with someone who mentors another. As a team there are more than one leader, and each person has their own unique way of demonstrating what that looks like. For me, I want to be a leader and with great communication, showing accountability, empathy not just for those in my care but those on my team. To remain goal oriented, finding ways together to improve practice/profession with measurable outcomes. By being a team player and remaining humble through it all.

    • #12835
      Barinder
      Member

      I believe there is a vast difference between managers and leaders. The role of a manager is closely tied with the representation of an authority figure. This includes ensuring duties/tasks are being completed and overlooking daily processes. On the other hand, leaders enable growth and ‘outside the box’ thinking, in order to reach a common goal.

    • #12837
      Allison
      Member

      Yes, there is a significant difference between managers and leaders, though the two roles can overlap. Managers are primarily focused on maintaining and optimizing existing systems and processes within an organization. Their key responsibilities often include planning, budgeting, organizing, staffing, controlling, and problem-solving, ensuring that day-to-day operations run smoothly and efficiently. Managers tend to concentrate on short-term goals and the immediate needs of the organization, following established procedures and protocols. Examples of managers include project managers who ensure projects are completed on time and within budget, and operations managers who oversee the production process in manufacturing plants.

      Leaders, on the other hand, are more concerned with inspiring and guiding people toward a vision of the future. They motivate and influence others, often challenging the status quo and encouraging innovation. Leaders focus on long-term goals and strategic direction, fostering an environment where people feel empowered to achieve their full potential. Examples of leaders include Steve Jobs, who inspired his team at Apple Inc. to create groundbreaking products, and Nelson Mandela, who inspired a nation with his vision of equality and reconciliation. While managers focus on processes and systems with a task-oriented perspective, leaders focus on people and vision with a strategic perspective, seeking to innovate and drive change. Effective organizations often require a blend of strong management and inspirational leadership to succeed.

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