• This Discussion Thread has 8 replies, 6 voices, and was last updated 1 day, 8 hours ago by Lena.
Viewing 8 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #2980
      Sharon
      Member

      Do you believe there is a difference between managers and leaders? Explain your position and provide examples.

    • #3203
      Jennifer
      Member

      Leaders and managers, we often use these terms together or to identify the same person or group of people. In health care, we refer to our senior leadership team or our senior leader. Are these truly leaders or are they just given this as a title. I believe that a manager can also be a good leader and a great leader can be a manager however, I do not believe that they are the same thing. Leaders have willing followers and are not necessarily in positions of power. Within my work place, I work with staff that are my peers and are great leaders. They are able to organize the unit and have the buy in of other staff to run the unit in the same way. They are confident in their skills as healthcare workers and have an air of positivity, they have complaints with solutions not just complaints; they work hard towards the end goal of making things more comfortable or better for their patients. These people in my eyes are leaders. Now let us talk about managers they are a different type of person they are not always leaders and are in positions of appointed power. Managers to me do not come with any special skills or traits that are remarkable to that person, they are appointed in to a position of authority based on education or seniority depending on the situation. Managers are in a position to keep the peace and make day-to-day decisions based on what is best for the company or the healthcare facility. Their goal is to ensure that policy and producers are followed and to ensure that units are staffed and safe for patient care. Therefore, in conclusion I believe that managers and leaders are very different people.

    • #3212
      Sharon
      Member

      Thanks Jennifer! And I agree that they are very different too. Often though, we don’t fully understand what the manager is responsible for and how that affects their ability to lead.

    • #3227
      Tania
      Member

      I believe that a good manager requires good leadership qualities, but a good leader does not have to have management qualities .
      Management is a position within a company that has been applied for, interviewed and excepted.
      A manager is a person of power, a defined role. Enforcing policies and procedures , approving vacation requests ext.
      They also deal with the day to day conflict at times. Client complaints and job role clarification are just a few examples.
      Leadership/Team lead, builds on skills and traits that a person exemplifies over time within the team . This can happen over time or even naturally within a team and recognized in Management.
      A leader is someone the team trusts, confident in their skill level and often helps with conflict within the team . A leader can be someone that people turn to in difficult times when management is not assessable, or to discuss ways in handling complex tasks that would not be appropriate to discuss with a manager .
      I do believe that their is a difference in managers and leaders.

    • #3228
      Lindsay
      Member

      I do believe there is a difference between managers and leaders, and you can see this difference in the areas that the managers manage. It may also depend on the role that the person is in. I worked in a small hospital where we had managers and then the senior leadership team, which comprised of the Directors and CEO. To me these are all just titles, just because you have a title with leadership in it, does not make one a leader. The best manager I had I would say she was more of a leader then a manager. After having several different managers/directors on different floors of the hospital, she was by far the best. She was the director of the ER, so she was able to focus her time and energy on the one specific unit, where other managers had several different units to manage each with their own uniqueness. I feel that these managers were stuck just trying to manage each of the uniqueness of each floor that they didn’t have the time to show any leadership. Working under both types of managers I can see, feel, and hear the difference within the staff. The ER Director was our leader and was able (over time of course) to get all the different personalities in the department to be able to work as a team under her direction and for one common goal. I believe that the reason she was able to do this is because of all of her leadership traits and skills which she incorporated as her base for her role. To sum it up, to me it doesn’t matter what your title is but who you are, because when you look at the traits and skills there is definitely a difference between managers and leaders.

    • #3232
      Jennifer
      Member

      Great example Lindsay, I would agree that the work of your ER director is how a leader is able to bring the team together, and that takes a special set of traits and skills that one has to personally develop over time. Your ER director had obviously had these traits and skills and I like the why you stated they she incorporated these into her role as the director.

    • #3253
      Erin
      Member

      I played a lot of sports in school (and still as an adult) and make the associations of Leaders and Managers easily in that type of setting. My head coach, is a Leader. She motivates each player individually and then collectively as a team, to work towards the future vision/outcome of winning the championship. She encourages us and gets us to want to be the best player we can be and to work together as a team to achieve the common goal.
      Depending on each player’s position on the team, there is an assistant coach or trainer, that manages the players in each different “department.” Most of these ‘managers’ are working towards immediate goals, and controlling risk; e.g. keeping our pitcher healthy for the play-offs, but also winning our next game.
      While working in healthcare, I have come across some amazing Leaders that were not in a managerial/leadership role. Looking back, these individuals had a lot of strong leadership skills and traits. When working with these individuals, they were able to bring the healthcare team together on the same page, which made the day/shift go by seemingly smooth, and you enjoyed working with them.
      To me, a Leader is someone that has the ability to motivate others, and even promote personal growth in others. To some, the title “Manager” can have a negative label associated with it. A Manager usually has authority over others, causing others to assume they have to be managed. In healthcare, Managers are usually the individuals that are ensuring policies and procedures are being followed.
      For me, there is a difference between a Manager and a Leader, but that’s not to say that a Manager cannot be a good Leader as well, and vice versa.

    • #3285
      Tania
      Member

      I agree with Erin. When a Leader and a Manager can work together with strong leadership skills, the workplace has better personal staff satisfaction less staff turnover and better client/patient care .

    • #3305
      Lena
      Member

      I believe there is a difference between a manager and leader. A good manager can be a leader as well by leading their team with respect, understanding and encouragement. However, a manager has the responsibly of organizing and maintaining the safety of staff and residence/patients by making sure everyone follows the policies and procedure of the building, CNO standards and guidelines and Public Health guidelines. Managers are also in contact with families and the house doctor almost daily. Nurse’s also have the responsibility to follow the CNO standards and guidelines daily.
      Leaders are individuals that are confident in their role and are looked up to by their peers. Leaders are made with experience, knowledge, and confidence in their title RPN, RN or whatever their titles are. Leaders teach and guide their peers in making decisions or actions together as a whole and can share the responsibility and actions with confidence. A leader also leads the team with respect, understanding and encouragement.

Viewing 8 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this Discussion Thread.