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    • #3019
      Sharon
      Member

      Think of an example of when you adjusted your communication to meet another person’s style. Are you a thinker, feeler, doer or imaginer? Why do you believe that is your style? Share your example and thoughts on the discussion forum.

    • #7379
      Grazielle
      Member

      After reading the article, I believe my “go-to” communication style is the “feeler”. I think this is my primary type of communication style because I like to try to imagine myself in people’s shoes – that way I can try and understand what they may need. As a program coordinator for oncology patients – I let my patients take the time they need to process what we have discussed and I acknowledge that they may be feeling overwhelmed. I make it a point to make the environment feel relaxed and pleasant so they feel welcomed to ask any questions or for any clarifications. However, depending on the situation, I also demonstrate the communication style of the “thinker”. When I am with management or when I join team meetings I find that I like to know the data or reason behind decision. When we have new projects – I like the process of working through all the details, the nuances, the ramifications, and implications of a decsion. Recently I had a meeting with our sales team, medical education team and doctors. During this meeting I presented a solution and included the reasoning WHY I made that decision and WHY/HOW this decision could improve an outcome.

      • #7634
        Valerie
        Member

        What a great combination of communication styles Grazielle!

        Feeling puts you in the patient’s shoes and allows you to look at a situation from a different angle. How would you feel? What would you want when it comes to your care? What are your beliefs and values?

        Being a thinker along side being a feeler allows you to take on the patient perspective and create the most ideal plan for the patient, the family, and the health care team to reach their goals.

    • #7756
      Nicole
      Member

      I feel I have a couple communication styles that I mainly use. First, the feeler as I am always taking others thoughts and feelings into consideration. When assessing my patients needs and barriers I have empathy over their situation, we talk it out and make a plan then I suddenly become a doer. Yes, some things in life are unfair and difficult to overcome, also out of our control. But we can’t dwell on that forever, we have to move on! So then comes the question, “What are we going to do about it?” Now we have a plan made and the patient has goals. I encourage them to move forward and keep them on track when they want to give up. I love watching their progress and they love it too! I think I might make a good rehab nurse as I have a lot of tough love to give! 😉

      • #7763
        Samantha
        Member

        I can relate to that approach as well! I sometimes have to remember to step back and see what the person I am talking to needs… do you need me to be a feeler by giving you a safe space to talk, or a doer by helping you come up with solutions to your problems. I feel like after reading your post, I should probably change my main option because it’s helped me see that I in fact am more of a doer when it comes to friends and family. I want to help everyone fix their problems when in fact they often just need a listening ear.

    • #7759
      Rebecca
      Member

      Generally, my communication skill is “Feeler”. I am most connected to emotions and thoughts of others. In Family Practice I appreciate getting to personally know our patients and their families. Iam definitely motivated by the sense of contribution to others health and well-being. I encourage teamwork and collaboration with both patients and coworkers.
      Like Nicole, depending on the situation I can easily transform into a “Doer” I want results for the patients and/or team. I can help patients with straightforward, goal orientated strategies to improve their health.
      Then flip back to “Feeler” and customize or tailor my message to what suits their individual needs to make a personal approach that will work for best for them.

    • #7760
      Rebecca
      Member

      I now realize we defiantly possess a blend of these communication styles and use them situationally. Communication is making a connection with others. Listening to them is a huge part of that.

    • #7762
      Samantha
      Member

      The interesting thing this weeks discussion has taught me is that until now, I hadn’t realized that I have 2 main types of communication methods and I adjust it automatically based on the setting and situation.

      While I rarely take on the “that’s how we’ve always done it so that’s how it’ll stay” approach, I believe in the work environment, my main communication style is thinker. When I show up to discuss something in a meeting, I come prepared. Especially if my opinions or suggestions are going against the grain. I like to make sure I am equipped with enough information that I can stand by my statements with confidence. I also like to really know what I am doing on the job so that if anyone has any questions as to why I am doing something, I can give them the answers (so I am always thinking about these things).

      With friends and family however, I am definitely more of a feeler. I want people to feel heard and not alone so I often use my own stories to help to relate to what they are saying.

      • #7781
        Christianna
        Member

        I am the same way. I like to feel that I am knowledgeable when I work. Nursing is a career that encourages you to be a thinker. Follow your scope, follow your policies, stay educated and current on practice but that also doesn’t mean like you said to just do things because that’s how you’ve done it!

    • #7766
      Kelsey
      Member

      I think that I am both feeler and doer. For my feeler side, I understand best with physical descriptors like images, seeing other’s feelings and I show my understanding similarly with reactions and words that show support. After discussing a problem with someone, I’ll find my self transitioning to my doer side. I will begin reacting during the conversation thinking of ways to solve a problem and wanting to get started on a resolution. I enjoy when a problem arises and get to see it be completed. There has definitely been times where providing solutions does not work for some people and thats when I have to take a step back and continue listening before providing solutions – if any. Sometimes people just want to talk and are not looking for a solution and thats when empathizing with them is the best.

    • #7775
      Katrina
      Member

      I am a combination of a Feeler and a Doer. For most of my communication to my teams, I often strive to ensure that I am listening to the thoughts of others and promoting a “community/Family” We work very closely as a team, and it is important to build a good communication style within the team. I am compassionate to the staff and feel that it is important for them to contribute in meetings as all staff have something positive to contribute to. I often will use stories from my personal experiences in life / previous jobs to help staff understand.

      • #7793
        Nicole
        Member

        I can agree with this! It’s important to “feel” others thoughts when making plans and collaborating within a team. Being a feeler definitely takes compassion for others.

    • #7780
      Christianna
      Member

      I definitely fit as a balance of doer/thinker. I absolutely value action, achievement and progress. I like a defined process and things to be straightforward. In meetings I like to keep the conversation on topic and use time productively. When people lose focus or change the topic of the meeting, I encourage them to stay on topic. When I worked in more front-line capacity, I used the same style when explaining a procedure to someone or educating them on their care options. Being a thinker and looking at logic and structure helps with planning and allows a concrete perspective. When we are working in our current project the logical process is what helps to keep the progress of the items we are dealing with.
      When planning, brainstorming or problem solving it’s important to be an imaginer and add creativity to a situation. Where I am working our company documentation is from the US and their suggestions are not always applicable so it requires a lot of creativity and thinking outside the box to create a workflow for Canadians.
      Last but not least becoming a feeler is an important part of nursing and leadership. Trying to be empathetic to a person’s situation allows for outcomes that created a balance. We all have emotions and reactions and when delivering messages and news it is important to be aware of how others would react.

    • #7381
      Grazielle
      Member

      I completely agree with you Jennifer. As much I believe I definitely use one type of communication style more than the others – it is definitely important to be able to adjust your communication style based on the person you are talking to OR the enviroment/setting you’re in. To be able to create a community of understanding, I believe a ” great leader” is someone who is able to read the room and adjust their communication style accordingly

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