• This Discussion Thread has 7 replies, 5 voices, and was last updated 1 month, 1 week ago by Jennifer.
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    • #3769
      Sharon
      Member

      Think of a time of difficult change in an organization that you were part of or affected you. What was the reason for the change?  Did you resist the change? Where did you see yourself during that change – as an innovator, early adopter, early majority, late majority, laggard or a rejecter?

      Using the above questions as a guide, reflect on a change that happened in your work environment.

    • #3861
      Erin
      Member

      I really had to reflect on this question. So much has changed period since starting a Nurse; from technology to staffing, to procedures, documentation, even the CNO standards. Choosing 1 to reflect on was hard.
      When my organization at the time, switched from an all paper based charting to computers it was a big change and undertaking. It was hard for the change agents to get everyone on board especially the staff that were not tech savvy or more mature and not familiar with using computers. During the change from paper to computers, I personally was an early adopter – I was comfortable around computers and had confidence that I would be able to adapt to the change and felt that this change was going to help me in my day to day work. I don’t feel that I was a complete innovator at the time, as I do like stability. We get set in our routines, the familiarity provides a level of comfort – which can all inhibit change.

      • #4028
        Jennifer
        Member

        Erin I can so relate to the change around technology. Our unit did the same thing we went from all paper charting to all online charting. This change can be very difficult for some and an exciting step into the future for others.

    • #3863
      Tania
      Member

      A few years ago we adopted an new EMR. We went from NOD to PS Suites. The clinic needed to have a more up to date system in order to launch us forward , better technology for providers/nurses and offer more to our clients
      I was on the EMR Committee. I was part of a team that worked in learning the program, what extras we would require and how to implement the new program . I was an early adapter. I had to help ease fears and promote the new system.
      I worked directly with staff during the “go live secession”
      I was able to see first hand during that change – innovator, early adopter, early majority, late majority.
      Some of this was based on age, computer skill level, fear, and confusion as this was a difficult switch. The two systems are very different.

    • #3864
      Tania
      Member

      I agree Erin. I feel like I am in “change overload”. With all the changes over the past couple of years , its difficult to keep them straight. I feel like I print the new change, throw out the old one and make sure to post the new change right in front of me to reference when required.
      Change is good, and needed as the science/technology is always evolving. I think I have been an innovator, early adopter, early majority, late majority, laggard at one time or another. When I get to the rejecter time, maybe that will be time to retire.

    • #3921
      Lena
      Member

      There have been a few things that had to change, but 1 change that I feel effected myself and those around me was the new protocols for Covid. I did not like the changes, but they had to be made to protect the residents, co-workers, the public, my family, and myself from the virus. I did not resist the change; I excepted the change. I felt it was the right thing to do for the residence and all involved. I knew there was always a chance I would need to protect the residence, staff, families, the public and myself from one thing or another. I feel I was an early adopter as I’m open to new ideas, I feel there are always change, change in policies and procedures, protocols, etc. I feel this was a difficult change as there is always the fear of covid affect us either at work or home. Having to wear a mask, face shield, full PPE, cancelling activities for residence and doing things differently yet trying to make everyone happy and content. With some residence having hearing loss or memory decline made it difficult for them and staff at the beginning. Residents not able to see loved ones to having scheduled visits. Now we are working short, not like we were not before. Staff not wanting to get the vaccine for whatever reason they have, we are know having to work extra hours to cover their shifts. This change which might be the new morn was and is difficult on all.

    • #4003
      Sharon
      Member

      Interesting posts! Technology is definitely one that we need to constantly keep up with, but is often difficult for some nurses to take on. I think one of the great things that happen to nurses is that Community of Practice, where we are able to support each other through change as we are all going through similar situations. I like to see innovators and early adopters here, although if you are taking a Leadership course, that is of course expected!
      I will add that I am flummoxed to hear of staff in healthcare that does not want to get the vaccine. That is a difficult choice to understand and the fact that it contributes to short-staffing now too must be very frustrating for all.
      Thank you for the discussions this week!

    • #4027
      Jennifer
      Member

      Change is an interesting topic while we are in a pandemic. Our whole nursing worlds were turned upside down in less then 24 hours and we were told its only for a couple of weeks. At that time I was an Innovator I embraced the changes for the great good of my patients and ensured that all the rules were being followed even if it meant that the rules changed every few hours or days. As the weeks turned into months I turned into an early adopter I was open to the change but was becoming tired of the constant change and was looking for some normal. Change is inevitable in nursing and especially during the last 19 months. The change in culture I feel was the hardest for me to deal with. During the start of the pandemic I would go to work greeted by cheers or car honking, signs saying that I was a hero, and the food oh my the food., We were gifted so many amazing lunches and dinners I lost count. As everyone else got overwhelmed with the pandemic we were soon forgotten, We kept showing up for work everyday but the lack of support and the weight of the pandemic outside of work started to weigh on us. Nurses started retiring early, young nurses left the career stating this isn’t what I signed up for and the rest of us just kept showing up. Then we started having to deal with change in our schedules change in our assignments we were being asked to work in areas of the hospital that we were not trained to do and this made us very uncomfortable. CNO supported this change and stated that it was ok for the hospitals to do this and that we needed nurses to support all areas of the hospital. Working in a new area that I was unfamiliar with and unsure of my skills and provided very little training made me turn into a late majority. I became negative about the change and skeptical around the motivations of the hospital. Then we were hit with more change the reopening of the province. Nurse were allowed to return to there home units once they became open however I looked around and realized that we didn’t have the same amount of staff to look after the same amount of patients. We were now through into a staffing crisis this was change again. From working with a constant staff group and able to work regular hours. To now working more overtime then I have ever done in my student year sand let me tell you I am no student anymore lol! Change, change and more change the past two year it was unavoidable I had no choice I adapted and I survived mostly through the ability to just put my head down and work. This is not a healthy way to adopt change but was necessary in the moment. Change is still happening but I feel that I am able to deal with it a bit better and have certainly taken on healthy lifestyle choices to cope with all of this change. Nursing will never be the same again. But hopefully with time we will change the culture for the better.

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