• This Discussion Thread has 12 replies, 6 voices, and was last updated 3 days, 5 hours ago by John-paul.
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    • #2849
      Sharon
      Member

      Who is your CEO, Chief Nurse Executive/Senior Nurse Leader/Director of Care, MPP and MPs – and post their names on the discussion board.

       

    • #7637
      Jen
      Member

      I am part of a small multi-disciplinary start-up company specializing in Dementia Care called Plum Tree Memory Care. Our CEO is also our founder Dr Linda Lee. I am the only nurse on the team at present. In my riding, Kitchener-Conestoga, the MPP is Mike Harris and the MP is Tim Louis.

      • #7706
        Eve
        Member

        Hi Jen. As being part of a smaller multidisciplinary team, do you find it difficult to connect with individuals (family members, clients, etc.) who have had personal experience with larger companies and/or facilities with a larger interdisciplinary team? Do you feel a part of a smaller team, you are able to provide more focused education to individuals dealing with dementia in their lives? I’m curious because in the facility I work in, there is a diverse team, who partake in different roles and have different specializations, to approach an individual with dementia, as well as, dealing with the stress of caregivers, entering the home. This can be positive, however, as many issues can be resolved at once, and focus can then be placed on direct care, rather than nurses providing quick inaccurate responses, due to an increase need for emotional support, with having to serve a large population. The response from the public has been mixed with family members finding traditional ways of dealing with dementia-related behaviour to be controversial during COVID, especially with the public health units, discouraging entrance to homes, resulting in reduced visitation and decreased time the resident population has spent with family. This has affected the coping of the residents and family during end-of-life care. With resources changing within the home, including creative ways to address critical nursing shortages, (RN/RPN) and the need for more complex residents needing to access LTC, I’m wondering if you have found alternatives resources directed towards families, that have been helpful, as the role of previous caregivers in dementia-care has needed to change with provincial and municipal mandates and a faster change in public health measures?

    • #7675
      Eve
      Member

      I work as part of an interdisciplinary team for an Extendicare LTC home. I currently work as a registered practical nurse on a unit, where we focus on the health and well-being of residents who are unable to manage medical concerns in the community or in retirement, are palliative and/or end of life or who live with dementia. The President and Chief Executive Officer is Dr. Michael Guerriere of Extendicare. The Director of Care within the home is Tara MacLellan. Our MPP of Muskoka is Norman Miller and the MP is Scott Aitchison.

      • #7713
        Katie
        Member

        Eve, we also have two Extendicare’s in Sudbury. Having had family in residence at one of them I have seen first hand how your interdisciplinary teams provide wonderful palliative and eol care. This is an area that is not talked about enough, LTC goes largely unrecognized in the Halt Care system as a specialized care unit and that needs to change. Kudo’s for all you do out there!

        • #7719
          Eve
          Member

          Thanks Katie. EOL care is challenging and difficult to provide when looking after a large amount of people at once. Luckily with COVID and more consistent staff, it has been easier to have 1-2 individuals who know the residents well and residents and/or family can be supported with a more direct approach needing to be used. Unfortunately we haven’t had as much community support and they have been backed up, but luckily training was provided ahead of time to PSWs and nurses needing it.

      • #7730
        Jen
        Member

        Hi Eve,
        I love that you mentioned not only health but also the well being of your residents. Meaningful engagement is all too often overlooked and it is so much more therapeutic than medication for so many people living with dementia. While working in LTC our goal was always to de-prescribe antipsychotics (understanding sometimes they are necessary) and it was amazing watching people ‘come back to life’ when they were no longer sedated by medications ordered for them before coming to us. Thanks for all your hard work!!!

    • #7712
      Katie
      Member

      I work as a Manager of Clinical Practice of Nursing for a government funded Bayshore Home Care Solutions branch in Sudbury. Our CEO/Founder is Stewart Cottrell and out National Chief Nursing Officer is Marlene Charlebois. At teh Branch level our area Director is Shannon Rentelis and Director of Clinical Management is Joelle Artidale-Lachance. Our MPP is Jamie West and MP is Viviane Lapointe.

      • #7729
        Jen
        Member

        Hi Katie,
        I would love to hear more about what you experience as a Manager of Clinical Practice. I can’t even imagine how this role evolved over COVID. What are the biggest gaps / concerns in health care you hear from patients / caregivers? I am interested because it is those gaps that my colleagues and I are trying to support and minimize.

    • #7720
      Amanda
      Member

      I work as an RPN for a Chartwell home in Barrie, Ontario. The CEO is Vlad Volodarski.
      The wellness manager is Lisa Batters, and the assistant wellness manager is Carley Leone. MP is Doug Shipley and the MPP is Andrea Khanjin

      • #7749
        John-paul
        Member

        Thanks for contributing to this week’s discussion, Amanda! Is the Chartwell location you work at a LTC or Retirement home? Was there anything from the readings that stuck out to you, or you believe affects you workplace? Would love to hear your thoughts.

    • #7728
      Jen
      Member

      Hi Eve,
      I come from working in both Retirement and LTC homes so being part of a small team has been amazing. I left LTC in Sep 2021 to join the MINT Memory Clinics full time (I have worked within them casually since 2012) and when my contract ended within the Memory Clinic (the nurse I was covering for was returning from sick leave) I was offered a role within their new company Plum Tree Memory Care. I should mention, it is the same physician Dr Linda Lee who I have worked with throughout these roles. Our team all come from the Memory Clinics so we have the same education / culture approach for dementia care. I found all the red tape in LTC to be such a barrier to care and during COVID times as you stated this was magnified. In the Memory Clinic model, the patient/caregiver meet with nursing, pharmacy and social work / OT together. We then separate where the nurse spends time with the patient going through a variety of cognitive testing, physical exam, cornell screening for depression and just companionship and getting to know the person / any of their concerns they may not feel comfortable discussing in front of their loved one. Similarly, during this time the social worker or occupational therapist meets separately with the caregiver to discuss any BPSD, caregiver coping strategies, and to provide education / connections to supports through HCCSS. Then we meet together again with the physician and the family/patient. These appointments run about 3hrs on average. We found many families over COVID expressing concern with the PSW/nursing shortage and lack of continuity / reliability they experienced and wanting to hire private pay PSWs/nurses. Through Plum Tree Memory Care – we offer Dementia Doula services where myself and an OT will help with navigational services or specialized services to support whatever their need may be. Often times the goal is to remain living well at home so we do everything in our power to support this. We also have a dementia specific education program for PSWs and a caregiver education support group. Quite a long winded answer haha but yes, I 100% feel working in a smaller team has enhanced both my knowledge base and the quality of care we can provide to those living with dementia and their families.

    • #7748
      John-paul
      Member

      Hello Everyone,

      Great discussion this week! Thanks for your contributions; it was neat hearing some familiar names in the list of leaders you’ve noted in your discussions. This week’s readings were a prime example of how leaders, especially some specific names in politics, have shaped our healthcare landscape.

      Eve, you make a great point about it being difficult to engage with patients and families, especially in larger organizations. It is tough that this is the case sometimes, and I agree – COVID most definitely exacerbate this issues further. I agree with Jen – you’ve also made a great point of focusing on the overall well-being of patients. It can be so easy to focus on the illness or condition our patients have, forgetting about the person/persons behind the patient, whether it’s the patient themselves, or families and friends they’ve involved in their care.

      Katie, it’s great to hear that you’ve experienced some excellent provision of palliative care. This is an area that I developed an interest in as well, and I’ve seen how important having the time to spend with patients and their families is. It’s definitely an area of care that doesn’t receive the recognition it deserves, especially in LTC like you mentioned. This is an area that I believe, is such an important concern that the Romanow Report highlighted. Anecdotally, I’ve seen some amazing palliative care provided in my own workplace, however I think there is more work to be done to give this area of care the resources it needs to enhance the quality of care that can be provided. Thanks for highlighting this.

      Jen, it’s amazing to hear the effective collaboration you and your team have caring for patients who have dementia. I can only imagine the difference that something like this makes in the lives of patients living with dementia and their family members. Imagine having the resources to provide this kind of service to all patients with dementia? I think it would be quite spectacular, and a worthwhile investment, and help address some of the issues discussed in this weeks readings.

      Both the overview of the Romanow Commission on the Future of Healthcare and the Rekindling Reform – Healthcare Renewal in Canada 2003-2008 articles highlight so many important areas of improvement of our healthcare system. Although much of that work has begun, there is still a lot to do, and I believe we can all play a role in this, big or small.

      Thanks again for a great discussion this week – I look forward to hearing more of your thoughts throughout the course.

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